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It may be obvious, but the title of this blog post is completely sarcastic. 

So the doctor prescribed Zyprexa for Matt. In a recent post, I went on about how I was reluctant in the past to give my son medication.  It has come to the point where it is very necessary. These expensive little yellow dissolvable pills are supposed to have a sweet taste to them.  This is clearly so it is easier to administer to young children, right?  Not my young child.  The first time I handed him the little yellow pill, he asked me what it was. “It’s your new medicine”, I said. Matt held it in his hand.  He stared at it. He sniffed it.  He squished it between his fingers (it’s a texture thing).  “Go ahead and eat it, Matt” I said. “It tastes kind of like candy”. I also handed him a glass of water in case he needed to help chase it down.

 He looked at me and then  placed the smushed pill in his mouth.  He swished it around in his mouth a little.  The pill must have some type of obnoxious aftertaste because moments after putting it in his mouth, he leaned over and spit it out in his water. Hmmmm, well that’s $2.33 worth of saliva in his glass. Sorry, thats Matt’s dad in me talking .

 “YUCKY!!!!!!”  he screamed.  Matt was upset with me for two reasons:  1. Because I told him it tasted like candy and it clearly did not.  2.  Because I had the audacity to suggest that he drink up the water that he just spit his yucky pill in. 

I chose not to  bribe or threaten right away.  For a kid with this amount of anxiety, such a tactic will usually trigger a large meltdown.  I did not want Matthew to associate taking his medicine as a negative event.  I decided my time and energy would be better spent finding ways of camouflaging the offensive tasting medicine.  Coke.  Matt loves Coke. I crushed the pill in to a powder and stirred it into a small glass of coke.  Here’s the problem with dissolvable tablets.  You can crush them, but once mixed with liquid, these floating granules have a ways of finding each other and clumping.  Added to the fact that these pills are florescent yellow, I am sure you can see the that the task of camouflaging was not easily accomplished. 

While Matt was in the living room watching Bugs Bunny, I turned the lights out so he wouldn’t notice the bright yellow specks in his Coke.  Then I handed the small glass to him.  He looked at me and smelled it.  Uh-oh! He suspects. He looked at me again with suspicion.  But he drank it.  Success.  That was day one.  Day two was a bit more unsuccessful.  He hates Coke now because he decided it tastes like “dog poop”.  Grr stupid medicine. I think I got 1/2 down him yesterday.  It’s too early to tell if it works.  He still has outbursts. A lot of his outbursts are now triggered by me trying to get him to take his meds. The only difference I see so far with the Zyprexa  is that he is a little more tired in the morning.  I had zero success getting him to take the medicine this evening. 

I will continue to brainstorm ways of hiding the meds.  Plan B will be having a reward for him if he takes it.  Sounds like a no-brainer-type plan but when you are dealing with high anxiety kids such as Matthew, it can actually be a recipe for disaster if the expectation is too much for the child.  I’m thinking of calling his doctor Monday to see about getting the medicine in a different form. 

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